Here is the building of the Blair and Warren clay roads in 1919-1920 including Rex Hunter, Jay Hunter, Howard Netherton, Guy Womack, B.T. Lacy, Johny Howser, Tom Marshall, Frank Hendricks, Fred Hendricks, L.R. Hunter and Jean Heath.


Remember Rosemarie’s? It was located on the south side of the square in the 1970s. Here is Sheri Fosher modelling one of the dresses they had in stock at the time.


The Future Farmers of America has abeen integral to the youth in Jackson County for years. Here is the Navajo chapter from 1992 with some names you might recognize. Seated from left are Stephanie McCombs and Tonya Madden. Standing from left are Charles Reynolds, Kevin Knox, Brad Howard, Kent Hurst, Blaine Carr and Scott McCombs.


One of the 12 Atlas intercontinental ballistic missiles which were buried deep in hardened silos in an irregular ring around Altus Air Force Base in the early 1960s stands poised — in case of need — for the call to war. The $65 million project at Altus was one of 13 “nests” of Atlas missiles scattered throughout the United States.


Here is the building of the Blair and Warren clay roads in 1919-1920 including Rex Hunter, Jay Hunter, Howard Netherton, Guy Womack, B.T. Lacy, Johny Howser, Tom Marshall, Frank Hendricks, Fred Hendricks, L.R. Hunter and Jean Heath.

Remember Rosemarie’s? It was located on the south side of the square in the 1970s. Here is Sheri Fosher modelling one of the dresses they had in stock at the time.

The Future Farmers of America has abeen integral to the youth in Jackson County for years. Here is the Navajo chapter from 1992 with some names you might recognize. Seated from left are Stephanie McCombs and Tonya Madden. Standing from left are Charles Reynolds, Kevin Knox, Brad Howard, Kent Hurst, Blaine Carr and Scott McCombs.

One of the 12 Atlas intercontinental ballistic missiles which were buried deep in hardened silos in an irregular ring around Altus Air Force Base in the early 1960s stands poised — in case of need — for the call to war. The $65 million project at Altus was one of 13 “nests” of Atlas missiles scattered throughout the United States.

Here is the building of the Blair and Warren clay roads in 1919-1920 including Rex Hunter, Jay Hunter, Howard Netherton, Guy Womack, B.T. Lacy, Johny Howser, Tom Marshall, Frank Hendricks, Fred Hendricks, L.R. Hunter and Jean Heath.
http://altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_IMG_0560.jpgHere is the building of the Blair and Warren clay roads in 1919-1920 including Rex Hunter, Jay Hunter, Howard Netherton, Guy Womack, B.T. Lacy, Johny Howser, Tom Marshall, Frank Hendricks, Fred Hendricks, L.R. Hunter and Jean Heath.

Remember Rosemarie’s? It was located on the south side of the square in the 1970s. Here is Sheri Fosher modelling one of the dresses they had in stock at the time.
http://altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_IMG_0561.jpgRemember Rosemarie’s? It was located on the south side of the square in the 1970s. Here is Sheri Fosher modelling one of the dresses they had in stock at the time.

The Future Farmers of America has abeen integral to the youth in Jackson County for years. Here is the Navajo chapter from 1992 with some names you might recognize. Seated from left are Stephanie McCombs and Tonya Madden. Standing from left are Charles Reynolds, Kevin Knox, Brad Howard, Kent Hurst, Blaine Carr and Scott McCombs.
http://altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_IMG_0562.jpgThe Future Farmers of America has abeen integral to the youth in Jackson County for years. Here is the Navajo chapter from 1992 with some names you might recognize. Seated from left are Stephanie McCombs and Tonya Madden. Standing from left are Charles Reynolds, Kevin Knox, Brad Howard, Kent Hurst, Blaine Carr and Scott McCombs.

One of the 12 Atlas intercontinental ballistic missiles which were buried deep in hardened silos in an irregular ring around Altus Air Force Base in the early 1960s stands poised — in case of need — for the call to war. The $65 million project at Altus was one of 13 “nests” of Atlas missiles scattered throughout the United States.
http://altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_IMG_0564.jpgOne of the 12 Atlas intercontinental ballistic missiles which were buried deep in hardened silos in an irregular ring around Altus Air Force Base in the early 1960s stands poised — in case of need — for the call to war. The $65 million project at Altus was one of 13 “nests” of Atlas missiles scattered throughout the United States.

http://altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/web1_IMG_0563.jpg
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